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Tell me what you are playing

Re: Tell me what you are playing
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2011, 10:43:18 pm »

But then once again. Between all the great moments are tons, tons, tons and TONS of tedious shootouts. They have really drawn out on stuff in this games and it really destroys it. Also the story and environments gets really ridiculous later on with everything added only to squeeze out more jumping and shooting to game, and negating most of the atomosphere.

I have watched a full let's play of Uncharted 3, and this effect is so incredibly vivid. Essentially what you have is a camp Hollywood film spliced with a shoot-out game, and neither part recognizes the other exist. I found myself countering every one-liner Drake made in cut-scenes with "you just SHOT 40 people". The interesting thing is that the set-pieces are rather astounding, but there is no way you can interact with them as natural environments, you swoop through them in endless chases.

I think the game beyond anything shows people are willing to believe they are part of the plot if you replace full-motion-video (which the cut-scenes basically are) with real-time characters that you get to do 'this thing' with when they are not busy being in a film.

Ironically, I found myself skipping through the gameplay sections on the let's play, which made the "everything interesting happens non-interactively" even more poignant. I would say that the type of interaction these games now have are the edge of what you can do without re-thinking play to make other things playable.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2011, 09:31:06 am by Jeroen D. Stout »
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Re: Tell me what you are playing
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2011, 10:43:14 am »

You make it sound like the shooting sections are like mini-games. Smiley
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Re: Tell me what you are playing
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2011, 11:40:02 pm »

You make it sound like the shooting sections are like mini-games. Smiley

more like mega-games? Wink
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Re: Tell me what you are playing
« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2011, 09:47:11 am »

My experience of L.A. Noire is taking a turn for the worst. The rigid linearity of the story is preventing me from being invested in the character I'm playing and taking the characters I'm interacting with seriously. When people answer to your questioning, you have the choice to respond with "truth", "lie" or "doubt". The problem is that the script knows what the right answer is and you even get graded on whether you guessed right. There is no room for deception for instance (you can't pretend to agree with a witness to make them confess more). There's also no room for me to imagine what the main character would think or for an emotional accord between him and the interviewee. The script knows the hard truth and you are graded on whether or not you know it too, disregarding what the characters might feel or what the narrative situation might call for. When I realized that my play was centered around second-guessing the script writer (as opposed to being immersed in the story), I started randomly hitting buttons instead of careful selecting "truth", "lie" or "doubt". It didn't matter anyway. The only difference my answers would make would be the grade that the game gives me. The story would continue, with or without me. So I stopped.
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Re: Tell me what you are playing
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2012, 04:53:59 pm »

I played a couple of hours of Mafia II ... there is a lot of notgaming going on in the game. Sometimes I really felt that I was in New York in the 40s (hm, don't remember the placeholder name of Mafia II). I found it very impressing just to drive the car and listen to the news about the ongoing war in Europe... unfortunately the game did a leap through time to the 50s, so that I could not experience the end of the war on a random street in the summer of 45 ... (remember where you were, when the war ended? would have been a great fake memory).

Also it was not consequential enough in its notgame design. There was a chapter where you were supposed to do some work at the harbour. Loading up a truck with boxes. You had the choice of quiting the job or doing the job (about 30 boxes). I was loading the truck very slowly ( the boxes were heavy, so that's what my avatar did). I said to myself, I am going to load up that truck even if it takes me 2 hours and then I get my paycheck.

Unfortunately, the game did not let me do it. After 5 boxes, I could not continue. The game refused to let me lift any boxes (not a bug, it told me that my avatar had enough)... so all effort that was made to create an illusion of agency or immersion was wasted...

a lot of shooting in the game, so I really can't recommend it to any non-gamer ...



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